Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Secondhand’

With over 200 vendors from across British Columbia and Alberta, the Fraser Valley Antiques and Collectible Show, now in its 18th year, on the surface appears to be like most antique shows. But it isn’t. Digging a bit further into its history one quickly discovers that this show, nostalgically referred to as the “Bottle Club” show, is quite unique in that it is run entirely by members of the Fraser Valley Antiques and Collectible Club (FVACC).

According to Brian Lefler who has been a member of the club for 35 years, “The club was pretty hard core in the beginning.” First known as the “Old Time Bottle Club of BC” it was established in the early 70s in the Fraser Valley. “Back then there were only twelve members and the only way you could join was if someone died,” says Lefler who was lucky enough to become an official member in 1972 when he participated in his first “dig” at Arbutus and 25th in Vancouver.

“For this select group of collectors, digging for old bottles was the common bond that brought them together,” says Tim Mustart a club member since 1985. “They would often get tips word of mouth potential excavation sites and actually dig for old bottles or historical artifacts on vacant lots or even better at a brewery site or a bottle making company.”

At one point they were also known as the “Valley Diggers”, says Al Reilly one of the club’s current historians and a member since 1971. Now in his 80s, the only digs he gets to are the ones in his garden but he remembers some of the first digs quite well. “There was a dig at 12th and Slocan, where the Italian Cultural Centre is now.” “It had somehow managed to get into an American publication on digging and a lot of people showed up from all over Canada and the U.S.”  He says this was a particularly good dig as there had been a ravine and people used to throw their garbage into creeks back then. Not good for the environment, but great for diggers.

Reilly believes that they were instrumental in helping to preserve parts of our history that could have just as easily been lost. “Diggers were not good archaeologists though,” says Reilly. “Instead of planning out the sites in advance, they would dig a deep hole and expand from there.” However he does go on to mention that “a good digger would always take the time to fill in the holes afterwards.”

As interest grew in the club they eventually had to expand and start to do things differently. In 1984 they became a non-profit organization and the name was officially changed to the Fraser Valley Antiques and Collectibles Club. Now with over 150 members, they represent an eclectic group of collectors who are “devoted to the identification, preservation, appreciation and collection of local historical antiques and collectibles.”

Accordingly, there is a different kind of digging going on these days. The club started to host an annual antique and collectible show while also holding monthly meetings where members could buy, sell and trade their prize possessions. They also publish a bi-monthly newsletter called the Fraser Valley Holedown.

For most members like Lefler, the shows offer an opportunity to sell off parts of their collection but more importantly it gives them a chance to connect, catch up and share stories with other members. “I now come over only once a year to do this show and socialize,” says Lefler who has since retired and moved away to one of the coastal islands. According to Tim Mustart, these shows also “help to support club activity financially while also encouraging new members to get involved.”

Other types of treasures unearthed at the show include vintage pop bottles, many still with pop in them, as well as old ginger beer bottles, glass inkwells, liquor bottles, and fruit jars. But the show is now about so much more.  Dealers also sell, among other things, tins, advertising, pottery, ephemera, antiques, train memorabilia, and even comic books.

As a result, the FVACC show is a special event that runs deeper than most shows in that it brings together a group of collectors and dealers who all share a common passion for digging through our past while also staying connected in their mutual respect for preserving our history.

Next show set for Saturday, April 21st 9am to 4pm and Sunday April 22 10am to 3pm. Admission: $3. Early bird admission on Friday from 6:30 to 9:30pm for $20. Click here for more details.

Read Full Post »

Once known as “Antique Row”, Vancouver’s Main Street has evolved into one of the city’s most eclectic and vibrant shopping districts. At first glance, it would appear that “Antique Row” no longer exists and that the stretch of antique stores that used to be found between 26th and 29th Avenue has been replaced by a new breed of designer and specialty stores. However, many of the original antique stores are still around, and several new stores have since opened…they are just more spread out in what could now be called “Main Street’s Antique Corridor”.

From just off Hastings Street all the way to Marine Drive you can easily visit up to 25 antique and collectible stores, all along one easy access route that crosses the city from North to South. Many of these shops also sell their wares online via their respective Web sites and will ship across Canada and the United States.

A great starting point is the Antique Market (1324 Franklin) which is located in an industrial part of town a few blocks east of Main Street. In the business over 30 years, this store started out on Main and was there 28 years before the owner, Harry Stryer, decided to consolidate the store front with the warehouse six years ago. An avid traveller and seasoned business man, Harry has transformed his warehouse into a stunning retail space that showcases and impressive collection of architectural antique wrought iron, antique French iron, period lighting, antique lighting, Chinese antiques, and antiques from England, Belgium as well as from more exotic places like Egypt and India.

From there, head west towards Main Street and visit The Source (929 Main).  Located on the border of Chinatown, this shop has also been around for over 30 years. Owned by two sisters, Lorraine Shorrock and Clare Reandy, The Source specializes in heritage iron and brass (building and furniture hardware), antique furniture, stained glass, architectural antiques, and British Pub items (e.g., original pub signs).

A few blocks further South on Main Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avenue, is another fun place to stop. Here you will find three vintage stores that specialize in Mid Century Modern; Your Fabulous Find, ReFind, and the new Space Lab. Although technically not antique shops, these stores cater to the “20 somethings” looking for Danish Teak, Art Deco, or what one of the owner’s affectionately calls “groovy bachelor pad stuff”. Maynards, which has operated as a Fine Arts and Antique Auction House since 1902, has moved their showroom next door at 1837 Main Street.

Just a few blocks up the road is another well known and respected antique store called Vancouver Architectural Antiques (2403 Main).  At this location since 1994 they specialize in antique lighting, fine antiques, and estate appraisals.

Continuing south, you come across two very different stores at Main and 16th Avenue; Sellution Vintage Furniture (3206 Main) and Alexander Lamb Antiques (3271 Main) which has a small backroom that houses a collection of vintage tribal photographs and artifacts in a mini-museum called Exotic World.

Baker’s Dozen Antiques is the next must see store on this route. Located at 3520 Main Street, this store caters to antique toy collectors but also features an impressive collection of dolls as well as a diverse selection of folk art and other harder to find antiques and collectibles. When there, ask to see Heather Baker’s provocative three dimensional collages in the back room.

Past King Edward Avenue and heading towards the original antique row is a cluster of antique stores that specialize in European, Asian, and North American antiques. Arriving here is like stepping back in time, many of the buildings in this area were built in the early 1900s. These include Red Corner Antiques (4219 Main), Modern Time Antiques (4260 Main), Red Rose Antiques (4285 Main), Renewal Antiques (4296 Main), Wholesale Antiques (4373 Main), JoJo’s (4376 Main), Abe’s Furniture (4386 Main), J&J Antiques (4394 Main), Le ‘Gent Antiques (4402 Main), Timeless Antiques (4406 Main), Old Stuff Two (4510 Main), and Sugar Barrel Antiques (4514 Main).

Of particular interest in this section of Main Street is Secondtime Around Antiques (4428 Main). In their 30th year of business on Main Street, the owners Mark and Tracey Porter buy mostly from Belgium and France and in lesser amounts from Austria and Germany. They do carry English antiques but buy them locally and selectively. With over 8000 square feet of showroom space, they offer a wide variety of styles such as Victorian, Art Nouveau, Arts and Crafts, Edwardian, Art Deco, Louis X1V, Louis XV, Federal styles including Hepplewhite and Duncan Phyfe, as well as Country French and Canadiana.

From here, head further south on Main all the way to Marine Drive, turn right and you then come across two other larger well known antique stores: Antique Warehouse (226 S.W. Marine Drive) and Farmhouse Antiques (1098 S.W. Marine Drive).

This makes for a full day if you plan to visit all of these stores, but rest assured there are many excellent places along the way to stop for coffee and lunch.

Read Full Post »

A small group of women on the east side of Vancouver have decided to take what they love to do and create a unique and viable business that makes a difference in their community. Only open for seven months, Miscellany Finds is a hands-on social enterprise that provides hard to place women with basic back to work skills through on the job training programs in their retail thrift store. All profits from the store help to further their social mission and are put towards programming costs.

Many of the women that they work with have had to face some very difficult challenges and need a special kind of support to help them transition back into the workforce. According to Portia Sam, the program’s coordinator, their mandate is “to validate women and help them build confidence and competence.” Zainab Bernard (Production Manager) also stresses that they are passionate about creating a fun and nurturing environment for these women to acquire basic lifeskills like time management and setting up a bank account, as well as specific retail job skills such as working with money, taking inventory, setting up displays, and customer relations.


And, all of this occurs on-site at the thrift store which is located on East Hastings, a few blocks east of Nanaimo Street. The store itself is quite charming and has a boutique feel to it…without the boutique prices. Separated into two distinct sections – humanity and home, they carry a little something for everyone.


In the humanity section they have a broad selection of everyday and brand name clothing and accessories for men, women and children. The prices are extremely reasonable and everything is clean and well organized. Prices range from $4 to $30 and although most items are contemporary, they do have some stunning vintage pieces.

For the home they have some newer as well as funky retro housewares, a few electronics, linen, books, records/CDs, movies, children’s toys, and some rather unique items such as an interesting looking sabre. They also had some nice pieces of furniture, including a beautiful antique phonograph record player that still works when you crank the handle. Prices here vary, depending on the item, but all still very reasonable (e.g., TV for $20). They recently just sold a gorgeous mahogany table with six matching chairs for $200.


They are currently also working on building a warehouse space so that they can increase their capacity for donations. Unlike many other places, they will accept almost any donation as long as it is clean and in working order. The only things that they will not accept are mattresses and children’s car seats (both because of health and safety reasons). They request that you call them first to make arrangements for the drop off and do have parking at the back of the store to make drop off’s easy. There is also ample street parking in front of the store.


This is definitely a place worth checking out, both Portia and Zainab have created a wonderful space that is inviting and immediately offers a sense of community.

Miscellany Finds
2615 East Hastings Street
Vancouver, BC
(604) 254-9999
www.miscellanyfinds.ca

Read Full Post »

The madness. The frenzy. And, the fun! These are the words that best describe the scene at the Talize thrift store in Delta early Monday morning. Although this Canadian thrift store has been at this location for just over five years, it is just now starting to gain momentum as one of Metro Vancouver’s favourite thrift shopping destinations – especially when they have their 50% sale.

“Attention shoppers, Wendy your shopping cart is ready.” This surprising type of announcement was a common occurrence on Monday morning. Doors had opened at 7am and with several hundred people in line to get in, all the shopping carts were already in use by 7:15. But, where one would expect chaos and flaring tempers, Talize staff had everything well in hand. A nice touch was that people could sign up to be on the list for the next available shopping cart, which most people would need as this was a day to shop in volume.

This thrift retail chain store originates from Ontario and currently only has one location in British Columbia. Still not as well recognized as Value Village or Salvation Army, this unique thrift store is gaining in popularity. Open seven days a week (often until 9pm) and located at the corner of Nordel Way and Scott Road in Delta, it is easily accessible from all parts of Metro Vancouver and has ample parking.


With several thousand feet of retail floor space, they carry an impressive selection of clothing and accessories for children, men and women, and to a lesser extent housewares, books, DVDs, CDs, furniture and electronics. Most of their stock is what they call “gently used” but they do carry some newer items as well.

The layout of the store is easy to navigate, with wide aisles that can easily fit two shopping carts side by side. Their stock is well organized with a huge selection in all sizes; ranging from petite all the way to plus sizes. Regardless of your shape or age, there is something for everyone and it is easy to find the colour, size and style that best suits your taste.

Regular prices are quite reasonable, running anywhere from a few dollars to $20 or $30 depending on what you are looking for. But during the 50% sale, everything is half price. Shoppers can often get designer labels such as DKNY, Calvin Klein and more for under $5. Brand name clothing and accessories from Old Navy and the Gap are also available for as low as $2 or $3 per item. They also carry a decent selection of vintage items for both men and women.

I would recommend signing up for their E-Flyer so that you will be the first to know when they have their next 50% sale.

Talize
11930 – 88th Avenue
Delta, B.C.
(604) 599-6116
www.talize.com

Read Full Post »

Vancouver Flea Market

One of the most recognized buildings in Vancouver is the long red barn-like building on Terminal Avenue. A landmark in the city since the early 1900s, the building was once rumoured to be a hanger for building aircraft during WWII. In 1984 it was converted into the Vancouver Flea Market and quickly became a favourite weekend destination for novice and seasoned secondhand shopping enthusiasts.

By the mid 90s things had changed. The flea market’s reputation became tarnished as it was known as a place for thieves to sell their wares. By 2001 Vancouver police launched “Operation Flea Collar” confiscating stolen items from 24 different booths at the market.

Fortunately, the Vancouver Flea Market came under new management in 2002 and a conscious effort has been made to return the market to what it once was–a safe and fun place to hunt for bargains. The flea market’s manager, Fabian Rumeo, is committed to continuing the clean up. “I want to make this a place where parents can bring their children, like a day at the PNE.” He does agree that it is still a work in progress, but with a new caliber of dealers and the inclusion of antique and collectible shows, they are well on their way.

The Vancouver Flea Market has one of the largest covered markets in the Metro Vancouver and is open all year with what they like to call their weekend “yard sales”. The market has close to 40,000 square feet and 360 tables filled with everything you can imagine – both old and new. The market attracts both novice and seasoned dealers, so you never you know what you will find. And, at least four times a year they host and Antique and Collectible sale. From collectibles and memorabilia to everyday household items, they hope to have something for everyone in the family. They even have a cafeteria onsite that offers breakfast and coffee to help start the day.

The Flea Market is located at 703 Terminal Ave., Vancouver (604) 685-0666. Open every Saturday, Sunday – 9am to 5pm, and Holidays 10am to 4pm. The next Antique and Collectible Sale is scheduled for Saturday, June 5, 2010. Admission for the regular flea market is .75 cents and $1.50 for the antique shows.

Read Full Post »

Several years ago I used to offer secondhand shopping tours called Secondhand Safaris all across Metro Vancouver. In tour buses, supplied by the late great Dan Tapp at Explore BC, we would venture to consignment stores, thrift shops, antique shows and so much more. In groups, sometimes as big as 75 and mostly women, we would set out for the day and stop at some of our city’s finest secondhand shops and shows.

These tours were quite unique and a lot of fun. There is something to be said about heading out on a secondhand shopping spree with a large group of like minded folks – who all love to scour through thrift shops, consignment boutiques, vintage stores as well as antique shows and flea markets….with the odd stop at a garage sale along the way. There were many fantastic finds but half the fun was just being out having a good time doing what we love to do…together as a group.

It has been a few years since I offered a tour but in thinking about going “on the road” again, I decided I wanted to do something a bit different this time. I wanted to go to London, England and I didn’t want to go alone. It occurred to me that a Secondhand Safari type tour to visit all the incredible London Markets might appeal to others as well. So I approached my good friend Alison at Marlin Travel, who was a partner in crime when starting the original Safari Tours. She jumped on board immediately and put together the most amazing travel package.

London Markets
From Portobello to Petticoat Lane, join Alison from Marlin Travel and Jo-Anne from Secondhand Savvy, for an incredible week in London exploring many of the famous (and lesser known) markets.

The date set is May 22nd, 2010 and the price (based on double occupancy) is $2010 per person (CAD & all taxes included) and includes all of the following:

  • Return airfare from Vancouver to London (all taxes included)
  • Round trip transfers between airport and hotel
  • 7 nights accommodation at The President Hotel *** in Central London
  • Hotel located close to shops, park, pubs, restaurants, and cafés
  • Continental breakfast at the hotel and coffee/tea tray in each room
  • London Visitor Travel Card (6 day pass for London’s Public Transit)
  • Ticket to see one of London’s premier shows (show confirmed before trip)
  • London’s “Hop-On Hop-Off” One Day Bus Pass (stops at key attractions)
  • Essential London ½ Day excursion
  • Marlin Travel Escort and Savvy Shopping Guide
  • Guided tours to as many markets as we can fit in
  • Guide with maps and information for over 60 London Markets
  • Comprehensive Insurance Package (Slight increase in price for traveller’s over 59)
  • EXCLUSIVE BOOKING BONUS Earn 50 BONUS AIR MILES® reward miles! Book by January 31, 2010.

The price will go up after January 31st, so book this week if you are interested! There are some terms and conditions, as with any tour, but if you are interested please contact Alison directly at (604) 438-3356 or 1-866-438-3356 or by Email at Alison.MoodyStuart@MarlinTravel.ca and she will go over all the specifics around this amazing travel package.

This should be a perfect trip for anyone who loves to spend hours at markets and then have a “show and tell” back at the pub in the hotel. There will also be time to visit other local attractions (with the Hop On Hop Off bus pass and the Essential London 1/2 day excursion, for those who can pry themselves away from the markets. And I was recently informed that the Chelsea Flower Show is  is happening May 25-29 which may be another fabulous market to visit for some.

Read Full Post »

Main Street Vancouver has gone tree crazy. As one of Vancouver’s most eclectic and vibrant shopping districts it is not surprising that they have launched a colourful new holiday tradition called “Get Your Tree On.” Forty merchants along Main Street have joined forces to decorate Christmas trees and are inviting shoppers to vote on their favourite and enter into a draw for one of two amazing gift baskets. Each store has contributed either a gift certificate or product from their store towards the gift baskets, making each basket worth just over $1000…definitely making it worth while to head over to Main Street this week and to vote for your favourite tree.

Shoppers can vote either online at www.shopmain.ca or at a ballot box located at Re-Entry Espresso (4363 Main). Voting will be open until December 12th at 12 noon. Flyers with a list of all the tree sites, and a ballot, are available at each of the participating stores. The draw will be held at 2pm on December 12th at Once a Huckleberry Bush (4387 Main Street) along with a performance by the Vancouver Children’s Choir.

There will also be food boxes in each of the participating stores collecting donations for the food banks at St. Michael’s Church on Broadway.

Each tree is quite different and appears to reflect the personality of the store along with its owners. Bodacious (shown above) has showcased a stunning green “plus size” gown as their tree and and in similar fashion, Solid Threads (3851 Main Street) has decorated a mannequin in a vintage green dress as their entry.

Echo Unique Resale (3553 Main Street) has gone a very different route and had children (and some adults) draw pictures of trees. The drawings are very sweet and offer a unique approach to this competition.

Down the road, Public Lounge has also enlisted the help of children and had them make tree ornaments out of wine corks to look like reindeer and angels. They were done by children in the after school program at the Mount Pleasant Community Centre.

Vintage trees and ornaments were also popular for many of the store owners. Laura Frederick from Dandelion Emporium used a vintage “tinsel” tree from the 1960’s and decorated it with gold army men ornaments made by local artist Laura Skuse (Exskuse Design). The tree is standing on the Branch Table by designer Harry Allen. Neptoon Records and CDs also used some classic vintage ornaments on their tree and Sellution Vintage Furniture (3206 Main Street) put their unique spin on things by using antique tea cups, broaches, and silver as decorations.

The spirit of giving was also an important theme for some stores. Bohemia Gallery/The Loft decorated their tree with warm mittens, gloves, hats and scarves…all of which will be donated to St. Michael’s church to support families in need. Two of Hearts Clothing (3728 Main Street) had local designers create ornaments for their tree and are all for sale with 100% of the purchase supporting the Adoptive Family Association.

Yummy treats also made their way on to a few trees. Tina Teoli from Miranda’s Hat (3860 Main Street) decorated her tree with candy…and with each purchase shoppers get to grab a piece from the tree to take home. In a slightly different approach, the tree at Life of Riley (3697 Main Street) had dog biscuits attached with red bows.

Artistic expression featured well throughout all of the trees. Barbara from Plush used beautiful green fabric to create her tree while artists from Arts Off Main designed their own decorations to reflect their art being sold in the shop. The tree on display at Body Politic also showcased handmade ornaments by local designers and the tree at Scala was decorated with paper cut outs, all individually created. Kiddo Consignment was also quite clever with their tree…they used white hangers to create the silhouette of a Christmas tree.

Although all the trees were beautifully and thoughtfully decorated, and I am sorry that I couldn’t list them all here, two stand out for me a bit more than the rest. I was pleasantly surprised when I walked into On The Fringe Hair Design and saw that they had used red hair extensions as tinsel and gold hair rollers as ornaments…but even more captivating was the “corset tree” that was on display at Lace Embrace Atelier…a very provocative approach indeed!

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »