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Posts Tagged ‘British Columbia’

At any given point I usually have at least three or four cookbooks in a stack by my bedside. This week’s selection includes Shelley Adams’ Whitewater Cooks: pure, simple and real creations from the Fresh Tracks Café, Marcella Hazan’s Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, Patricia Wells’ Vegetable Harvest, and my latest fun acquisition, Edna Staebler’s Food that Really Schmecks. Mennonite Country Cooking.

I tend to read cookbooks like other people read magazines. At night, and sometimes in the morning, I will go through each of them slowly, hovering over beautiful photographs and interesting stories, usually marking off pages with bits of scrap paper or sticky notes; highlighting the recipes I want to try next and making notes of some helpful tips and techniques. After a few days I will carefully put them back in their designated bookshelf or stack, and pick out a few more.

They are my escape. But also, my inspiration.

From these books, I have learned to become not only a better cook, but a more relaxed one. Cooking has become my way of de-stressing – a mindful practice that starts long before I enter the kitchen. It begins with the hunt for new and interesting cookbooks. And by new, I mean new to me. I prefer to find cookbooks in thrift stores, garages sales, used bookstores, as well as at garage sales and church rummage sales. I especially like it when someone has already marked off their favourite recipes with notes and suggestions. This way I know which recipes to try first.

I also enjoy attending cookbook launches where the author is present and I can purchase their latest book. I love hearing their stories first hand as well as learning about their personal journey with the publishing process. I am usually the one in the back with my hand up asking a bunch of questions. Which recipes stand out most to you and why? Do you have a favourite cookbook (other than your own), and if so which ones and why?

The last question usually leads me on another hunt if I don’t already have the cookbook they mention. From them I have learned about highly respected cookbook authors such as Patricia Wells, Paula Wolfert and Judy Rodgers. And sometimes the answers are surprising and fun. Recently I had the pleasure of meeting Yotam Ottolenghi when he came to Vancouver to promote his latest cookbook Simple. When I asked him what his favourite cookbook was, without hesitation he said “Nigella Lawson’s How to Eat.” I have a few of her other cookbooks, but not this one. So a new mission is afoot!

Yotam Ottolenghi Book Signing 2018

And all of this has further deepened my love affair with cooking and cookbooks.

With so many recipes and cooking information available on the web, I am often asked why I still bother to purchase cookbooks. My answer is simple, I don’t believe that print is dead. Especially when it comes to cookbooks, new and old.

Although you can go online to find just about any recipe, it doesn’t give the whole story. A digital search works just fine when in a hurry as it is efficient and practical, but it lacks the piece that provides the context and the extra bits of information that I love so much. And where would I put my sticky notes?

Working on cataloguing my cookbook collection.

Good cookbooks evoke a sense of place and time, providing us with a picture of how people live. They preserve traditions and recipes, capture stories, and are entertaining. They also encourage us to find our own voice in the kitchen. This has certainly been true for myself.

I will continue to add to my rather large collection of cookbooks while also finding new and wonderful recipes to try. There is always room by my nightstand for at least one more!

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Show us yours and we’ll show you ours. Nearly one in every three people in North America collects something. People collect for pleasure. They also collect to remember, to preserve, to belong, to make sense of the world.”

This is what was written at the entrance of the Museum of Vancouver’s (MOV) exhibit that featured 20 Vancouver collectors and their rather unconventional collections last year. It was a beautifully curated show that invited visitors to enter into the fascinating, and sometimes unusual, world of collectors. Guests could also become part of the show by sharing their own collections on red and white post-it notes that were placed on the walls around the entrance and through a digital display that featured contributions to the hashtag #MyCollectionatMOV.

The show was the brainchild of Viviane Gosselin, the Senior Manager, Curatorial and Curator of Contemporary Culture at MOV. “I have been working in the field for 20 years and meet so many collectors”, says Gosselin. “Collectors are my experts. They know all the details. They have specific knowledge, bridging between public and private knowledge. Museums are always relying on collectors.”

“But because each show takes two to four years to set up”, says Gosselin, “we can’t offer a show or do justice for every collection.” As a result, Gosselin had “collected” several collectors over time. Even though she couldn’t offer each of them a solo exhibit, she believed that “it was worthwhile to pay attention to their world and their passion and doing it as a way to study the phenomenon of collecting.”

This eventually led to the idea of a group exhibit that would explore “the act of collecting, the collector’s vision and the role collections play in building identity, public memory and social connections.” But more specifically, it was meant to potentially provide insight into the questions of why people collect and if private collections affect public consciousness in any way.

When asked which collectors stood out for her, Gosselin had many but highlighted three in particular: Melanie Talkington, Rob Frith, and Kyle Seller.

Gosselin was impressed by Talkington and her collection of corsets. “She learned to make corsets by deconstructing them and turned her collection into a viable business.” Talkington, who has been making, selling and collecting corsets for over well 20 years, owns Lace Embrace Atelier, which is located in Vancouver.

From her very first purchase of a red wool corset in 1997 and after years of collecting, it is no surprise that she is considered a corset expert and has one of the largest antique corset collections in the world.

“I now have over 300 antique corsets, hoops, garters, stockings and children’s corsets,” says Talkington. “My collection has shaped my lifestyle. I created a fun and interesting business out of my passion for corsets. It has taken me around the world to work on museum exhibitions, participate in trade shows, and make new acquisitions.”

Sharing her knowledge, and educating others around the many different roles corsets played in our history, continues to be important for Talkington. In 2013, the Louvre Museum in Paris borrowed 40 of her corsets for The Mechanics of Underwear exhibit and plans to make her private collection more accessible to the general public by creating a museum in the back of her retail store.

Another, standout for Gosselin was Rob Frith and his display of vintage concert posters. “You can tell music has played a big part in his life.” And indeed it has.

Rob Frith owns Neptoon Records, Vancouver’s oldest independent record store. Although Frith has several items that he collects, the concert poster collection is one that is near and dear to him. “Music means everything to me. Posters are an important part of that. I have thousands and thousands of posters. Most are from Vancouver, but I have some from all over.”

He acquired his first poster when he was 12 years old. “I was always interested in art, especially art that was interesting and weird. My dad was a builder and had bought a house that had been rented by draft dodgers. He took me to the house to help clear it out and on the walls were several concert posters. I was blown away by the artwork and took them home and put them up on my bedroom wall.”

From then on he started to notice them all around Vancouver. He also went to his first concert when he was in Grade 8 and started to casually buy posters after the shows. Eventually his passion grew to include records. This led to him owning a record store and creating his own record label. “I have also reissued records and the posters have come in handy for those projects.”

Sharing his collection with a broader audience also matters to Frith. “I feel that this collection is important, it is a historical document. I have let people use my posters for illustrations in books, LP and CD releases, newspapers, magazines, television, and movies.” He has also been scanning images of all of his posters and placing them on his Facebook page.

Kyle Seller is another collector who stood out for Gosselin. Several of his vintage pinball machines and arcade games were on display at the MOV. All were in working condition and people could play some of them for a dollar or less.

Seller bought his first arcade game (Bubble Bobble) when he was 16, and still has it today. His collection has since grown to include around 60 and having to be creative with storage has led him to build a unique career for himself. “With my business, East Van Amusements, I restore pinball machines and rent pop-up arcades in pubs and other establishments around the city.”

According to Seller, the pinball and arcade market has found new life in Vancouver. “There are pinball leagues with regular tournaments and a massive culture for collecting.” All of this is good news for Seller as he continues to find new and exciting ways to be a part of that community and grow a business that fuels his passion.

In terms of why she thinks people collect, Gosselin suggests that it is related to how people see themselves. “It is tied to their identity and is an identity building process. As you build your identity, you are building yourself. They are always in that process of building, selecting and following their passion. Starts with intuition and interest but then you become more knowledgeable. And you get to know yourself better in relation to different topics.”

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Seahawk Auctions held its 63rd auction last spring on March 19th, 2017 at the Engineers Auditorium in Burnaby, British Columbia. Although attendance at the auction was down slightly, their online presence was quite good with 125 bidding online. According to Seahawk’s CEO, Bill Neville, “the lower numbers at the actual auction may have been due to spring break and that other antique shows were also being held on the same day.”

There were about 375 items up for auction and those attending in person were privy to a few extra pieces that were not listed online. Although they are still finalizing all the sales from the day, Neville estimates that total sales so far at around $120,000.

Some of the auction highlights for Neville included at 19th Century Plains beaded pipe bag with different geometric designs on each side as well as a 19th Century Plains beaded belt and belt pouch with geometric designs and brass tacks. “Both had very nice bead work,” says Neville “and it is not often that we see the belt and pouch together, they tend to get separated over time.” Both did quite well at the auction, with the pipe bag going for $1,800 and the belt with the pouch being sold for $3,500.

In general Neville feels that the market for harder to find items, like the beaded belt with the pouch and totems by Ellen Neel, continue to do well and the more rare obscure items like the Dick Hawkins totem, are even doing better. However, according to Neville, “middle of the road items, such as baskets with some damage, are not doing as well. Collectors are just not as interested. In the past these utilitarian items did quite well, even with a bit of damage, but not so much these days.” As a result the market is more saturated and they don’t move as quickly.

And every once in a while, something totally unique crosses their path that doesn’t quite fit what they normally sell but is still considered quite special. For Jeff Harris, from Westwillow Antiques, this was a collection of RCMP memorabilia that included three 19th century items collected by Constable P.M. Rickard of the Royal North West Mounted Police (RNWMP). There was a buckle, a RNWMP vest pin, and a pair of spurs and a horse whip with the Canadian Crest. According to Harris these items came from Constable Rickard’s great granddaughter. But what truly impressed Harris was that these were all purchased by a local RCMP officer who actually collects RCMP items. “Not sure how he found out about them as this is certainly not what this auction is known for,” says Harris “we almost expected these items to disappear into obscurity but there is a real sense of gratification and feeling of success when these types of items find the proper home of a collector who will really enjoy them.” Together they sold for $425.

On a different and much sadder note, the West Coast is mourning the loss of a world renowned and gifted artist. Beau Dick, who was a master carver, Indigenous activist, and Kwakwaka’wakw hereditary chief from the ‘Namgis First Nation in Alert Bay, passed away on March 27th. Several pieces of his work have been featured in past Seahawk auctions, leaving quite an impression with Jeff Harris who knew him well. “His work was always well respected, especially by carvers. He not only had a hand for carving but his painting ability was perfect, he had a steady hand. He will be admired for many years to come. His greatness will be rediscovered over and over by the pieces that he has done.”

“He was a great carver who passed away way too young,” says Neville. “Of all the carvers we will remember him forever.” Harris agrees and goes on to say “He was quite the character and had mastered the shamanism of his culture. He was born with forms and shapes in his mind…he was a natural. I still felt that he had a lot in him to give. He had that magic to always be amazing. He knew a lot of the myths and stories and deeply understood them, and this informed his work.” Dick was only 61 when he passed away.

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It is that glorious time of year when many of the local churches and community centres have their annual spring rummage and thrift sales. Here are the dates for the ones that I know about so far.

West Vancouver Seniors’ Activity Centre Annual Flea Market
Sunday, April 23 from 9am to 3pm
West Vancouver Ice Arena
786 – 22nd Street
West Vancouver, BC

Knox United Annual Thrift Sale
Friday April 28th, 5pm to 8pm and Saturday April 29th, 9am to 12noon
5600 Balaclava Street (just off 41st)
Vancouver, BC

St Mary’s Kerrisdale Rummage Sale
Friday, April 28, 5pm to 8pm and Saturday April 29th, 9:30am to 12noon
2490 West 37th Avenue
Vancouver, BC

St. Philips Rummage Sale
Saturday April 29, 9:00am to noon
3737 W. 27th Avenue
Vancouver, BC (just west of Dunbar)

Gracie’s Thrift Store
Saturday April 29th, 10am to 2pm (and every other Saturday)
803 East 16th Avenue
Vancouver, BC (off of Kingsway and 16th)

West Vancouver United Church’s Elegant Flea Market
Saturday May 6, 8:30am to 2pm
2062 Esquimalt Avenue (at 21st)
West Vancouver, BC

21st Century Flea Market
Sunday May 7, 10am to 3pm  $5
Croatian Cultural Centre
3250 Commercial Drive (at 16th Avenue)
Vancouver, BC

The East Side Flea
May 19-21 (and every other weekend)
Friday 6pm – 10pm, Sat/Sun 11am – 5pm
1024 Main Street (Ellis Building)
Vancouver, BC

South Granville Senior’s Centre Spring Bazaar
Sat. June 3, 10:00am – 2:30pm
1420 West 12th Ave.,
Vancouver, BC
A $7 soup & sandwich lunch will be served from 11:30-1:00

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The Kerrisdale Antiques Fair has become a much loved and anticipated event in Vancouver. Now in its 16th year, it remains one of the few antique shows still being held on a regular basis. Offered in the spring and fall each year in the Kerrisdale Arena on the West Side, this show brings together some of the finest dealers from across BC as well as from other provinces…many of whom have been doing the show since it first began in 2002.

For Renee Lafontaine, the show’s organizer, setting up a two day antique show back then was a bit of a risk but she was ready. “I had been putting on our collector flea markets at the Croatian Cultural Centre successfully for two years which gave me the confidence to take on a bigger show.” She had also done her homework and initially sought out some help. “I brought on a business partner to help and we selected Kerrisdale for many reasons — the historic venue, great high-density neighbourhood, lots of parking, affluent demographic, etc.”

It was a lot more work to have a two day show and that was stressful at first for Lafontaine. “I totally underestimated what a huge undertaking it would be to mount a new show, and how much stress came with that…I don’t think I slept at all the week leading up to the first show! So much effort and expense had been put into promoting the show, but would anyone come? To this day, I still worry about that right up until we open the doors and the crowds roll in!”

Her fears were just fears. She didn’t have to worry back then nor does she need to worry today…there is an impressive loyal following of people who come to each show rain or shine. And, every season there is a new crop of eager and delighted shoppers, young and old, discovering the show for the first time. According to Lafontaine, there are between 2500 to 3000 people who attend the show over the two days.

And, the reason people keep coming back is because of the incredible amount of work and care that Lafontaine puts into each show. This is also why so many of the initial dealers have also stayed on to do the show year after year.

Westminster Antiques

Westminster Antiques

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wendy and Maynard Cook from Westminster Antiques remember the very first show well. “As every first show, there was cause for great anticipation,” says Maynard Cook. “We weren’t sure what to expect, but as always Renee, the show organizer, delivered. The buyers were excited to be there and the sellers brought a great display of wares. We sold everything from furniture to crystal and kept selling…with the busy crowds until the show closed.”

The Cooks, like many of the dealers, sell a large variety of items that they carefully select for these shows. “We have jewelry, clocks and bears as part of our display. We have found that the higher quality items sell well at this show and we try to hand pick a few of our better items to bring here.”

Original Art Deco Art Glass Architectural Intaglio Glass Pane – Westwillow Antiques

Jeff Harris, who along with his wife Jane run Westwillow Antiques, have also been doing the shows since 2002 and have even had the same spot near the front entrance. He remembers back to before Lafontaine had become a show organizer. “Many many years ago when she was a dealer I was one of the people who encouraged her to start doing the shows. There was a definite need. She is very much at home.” Harris goes on to say “she is wonderful at getting all the ducks in line. That is a side to her that we appreciate…her organizational skills. We respect that tremendously. She also has the ability to pull people into the show…and in this business that is a real art.”

Linda Devine has also been doing the show since the very beginning and has also been in the same spot ever since. “I guess what impressed me from the very first was the size of the crowds that waited patiently until the doors opened. Since then, the show has only gotten bigger and better, so I would never give up my prime spot just inside the entrance. I think I have only missed one show and that was because I was away on safari in Africa!”

Gold and Enamel Powder/Pill Box made by Cartier circa 1925 – Linda Devine

Devine, who sells primarily high quality antique and designer jewellery, has noticed some interesting changes over time. “I have found over the years that the diversity of cultures in Vancouver is now reflected in the diversity of customers at the show. Young people come to look at engagement rings, older people look for items that excite memories and celebrate events such as anniversaries and birthdays.”

For Justin Tee, who sells antique and vintage silverware, the first show offered more than just a place to sell his wares. “I did pick up some new clients at that show that are still clients (and friends really) today.” He goes on to say that, “the only thing that has changed is we now sell exclusively high-end products because that is all the market wants right now.”

German Sterling Silver Cow Creamer c1930 – Justin Tee

Sandy Sieradzan has very vivid memories from when the show was first held in the historical Kerrisdale Arena (which is a skating rink during the winter). “I remember the first show easily, because it was so cold! I think the ice had just been taken up a few days before and we would go outside to get warmed up. One of the dealers across from us, brought in a heating pad and we would all take turns sitting on it.” Sieradzan goes on to say that “It has certainly warmed up over the years. Thank goodness. But as each year passed more and more people have discovered this show, and we are so busy, no one has a chance to get cold.”

They sell mostly china and silver, “what we call pretties,” says Sieradzan. “Over the years we all try different things, like furniture or primitives. But for us, the pretties work the best. We had a customer tell us one time, that we were like two old crows, always going for the shiny. Then I guess he realized how he had said it, because he spent the next ten minutes trying to stammer his way out of that comment. We didn’t mind. We laughed, as it was true.”

Lafontaine also has some thoughts about how things have changed since the show first began. “Looking back at the early shows, we had a lot more furniture in the mix…the number of furniture dealers gradually declined over the years as the show evolved into more antique and vintage decor accessories, estate jewellery, ephemera — more “smalls” vs. large furniture pieces.”

Her theory is that people are reluctant to make big furniture purchases at a two-day show, since measurements usually need to be taken and people have to figure out how to get it home. “Lamps, chairs, occasional tables, and other smaller furniture pieces tend to be a much easier sell. And as the buyer demographic has changed over the years, so too has the styles they collect. Victoriana was very popular back when we started and now mid-century Modern is having its moment…it’s always been a cyclical business so it’s anyone’s guess what the next hot trends might be.”

But with all that said, Lafontaine cautions those who think that the show is not for them, “Don’t let the word antiques scare you–antiques and vintage collectibles come in all shapes and sizes…and prices! You’ll find retro mother-of-pearl buttons for $1 and maybe an Art Nouveau lamp for thousands…and just about everything in between!”

When asked what seems to sell the best at the show these days, Lafontaine says “jewellery is definitely at the top of the list, and then decorative accessories in vintage and antique glass, china, pottery and silver.” With an average of 60 dealer booths, totaling over 250 tables filled with everything you can imagine, there really is just about something for everyone. Whether you are a seasoned collector, dealer, avid shopper, or just curious, you might want to pop by the show to check it out for yourself.

Kerrisdale Antiques Show
2017 Dates: April 8 and 9 and September 2 and 3
5670 East Boulevard (at 41st Avenue)
Vancouver, British Columbia
Open 10am to 5pm
Admission: $7
Children Under 13 Free with Adult

**Most of the images of the items above will be for sale at the show in April (where the dealer is indicated)

CLICK HERE to get a $2 off coupon for SUNDAY

 

 

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Avid thrift shoppers will be thrilled to learn that Talize plans to open their second BC location in Langley later this summer.

**Grand Opening of Langley Location Thursday September 28th, 2017**

This is terrific news on many levels. It means additional industry related jobs, a boost for the local economy, more opportunities to keep recyclable items out of the landfills, increased support for the Children’s Wish Foundation, and of course another wonderful shopping destination for savvy secondhand shoppers.

Founded in 2005, Talize is a Canadian owned and operated thrift store chain with seven stores currently in operation (six stores in Ontario and one in Delta, BC). As well as the new store currently under construction in Langley, there are two more being planned for Ontario in Kingston and Barrie.

The store in Delta, which opened its doors in 2006, recently celebrated its 10 year anniversary. Laurel Stan, who has been the Assistant Store Manager in Delta, is proud to be part of a supportive work culture that takes care of its staff and customers. According to Stan, “the Delta store has around 50 team members, with many having been here since we first opened as we like to promote from within.”

Even Stan herself has what she calls a “secondhand love story”, both she and her husband Eric Nykamp met while working at a rival thrift store before moving over to work for Talize in Hamilton, Ontario. Nykamp started at Talize in 2007 and Stan in 2008. And, in 2010 they leapt at the chance to relocate to BC to manage the Delta store. Nykamp is currently the Store Manager and Stan the Assistant Store Manager. Come this summer, Nykamp will become the District Manager and Stan the Store Manager for Langley.

And, true to promoting from within, Stan’s Assistant Store Manager in Langley will be Corrie-Lynn Parries who began working as a part-time cashier at the Delta location shortly after it first opened. Her mother, who also works with Talize, had encouraged her to take a part-time job while still in school.

There are other perks to working with Talize, such as staff discounts. However, Stan cautions that “there is a misconception that staff get first pick of all the good stuff. The truth is that they don’t get to buy anything until it has been on the floor for 24 hours.”

With over 25,000 square feet, Talize is able to showcase a large culturally diverse selection of clothing and accessories for both men and women (beautifully organized by size and colour). They also have an impressive section for children’s clothing and toys, bookcases filled with every type of book that you can imagine, rows and rows of vintage, retro and modern housewares, as well as a small back section with electronics and some small appliances.

The store relies on donations to keep itself well stocked with quality merchandise while also encouraging people to keep items out of landfills. They accept donations of gently used clothing and household goods which can be dropped off in a bin at the front of the store or if it is a larger donation it is best to take it to the back loading area. As a thank you for these donations, they offer donors a $5 off coupon towards their next purchase at the store.

There are also several purple donation bins around the city (look for the ones with the Children’s Wish Foundation logo). They cannot accept furniture or any kind of TV screen or baby items due to safety restrictions.

According to Stan, this is a high turnover industry with regular customers coming in weekly and many local dealers daily. “In the back rooms, we process 8,000 to 10,000 pounds of stock every day. It is important for us to keep fresh items coming out.” As a result, they have a large production team (25 to 30 staff) who are responsible for processing, sorting and pricing all of the incredible donations received on a daily basis.

Unfortunately, due to damage or other restrictions/issues, some items cannot be sold. For these items, Evgeni Shteinberg, Talize’s Marketing Director, says that Talize is equally committed to being environmentally conscious. “We recycle as much as possible. Metal, electronics, books, housewares, cloth, shoes, purses and clothing accessories are all recycled. In fact, we recycle more than 1.5 million pounds of items per store that would otherwise be destined for the landfill each year. That works out to approximately 100M pounds of recycled goods that Talize has helped keep out of local landfills since its inception.”

Donations not only support Talize’s commitment to a “greener environment”, they also help Talize raise much needed funds for a Canadian charity. According to Shteinberg, “Talize is a proud platinum partner of the Children’s Wish Foundation and through this partnership, we have contributed over $1.5 Million to date.” The Children’s Wish Foundation helps children, families and communities by granting a wish of a child diagnosed with a life-threatening illness. Talize also likes to participate in local community events such as the Vancouver Halloween Parade.

There are many wonderful reasons to consider shopping at Talize, and I would like to add one more…their store wide sale which has everything in the store at half price. The next sale is coming up on Monday, March 27th at all of their store locations. Doors open at 7am until 9pm.

For more news on the Grand Opening of their store in Langley, I would suggest subscribing to their Enewsletter and liking their local page on Facebook.

Talize Delta (BC)
11930 – 88th Avenue, Delta
Ph. (604) 599-6116
Hours of Operation:
Monday to Saturday 9:00 am to 9:00 pm
Sunday 10:00 am to 7:00 pm
www.talize.com

Talize Langley (BC)
20450 Logan Avenue, Langley
Ph. (604) 282-3874
www.facebook.com/Talize-Langley

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steveston-2Recently I made a very happy discovery while deciding to have a “staycation” locally. I found myself in Steveston Village, British Columbia. I have been there numerous times…but mostly for fish and chips at Pajo’s or Dave’s Fish and Chips or to pick up some of the local catch straight off the docks when in season.

But this time I found myself there on a rainy winter day and decided to see what secondhand shops I could find. To my delight I found two fabulous thrift stores that were beautifully organized with an eclectic selection of books, housewares, clothing, accessories, and so much more. Both were charming and staffed with the nicest volunteers who worked hard to make their stores welcoming and fun to shop.

My first stop was at the Richmond Hospital Healthcare Auxiliary Thrift Store which is located in the cutest re-purposed old church located at 3731 Chatham Street. Be mindful of the hours, they are only open Monday – Friday 10AM-3PM. I loved the old school charm with slanting floors and terrific prices.

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Next I found myself at the SOS Children’s Village BC Thrift Store, located on the main strip in Steveston Village at 3800 Moncton Street. They also have a store in Kerrisdale in Vancouver. This store was set up more like a boutique, but still the prices were incredibly reasonable and the volunteers were also quite friendly and helpful.

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Going a bit more upscale I found myself in the most wonderful bookstore, Village Books & Coffee House. With wall to wall books and serving aromatic coffee and fresh baked goods, one could spend hours here. I was especially impressed with the cookbook selection and their children’s section which was currently under construction. It is located at 12031 First Avenue.

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Last on my stop was the Steveston General Store which was next door at 12071 1st Avenue. Beautifully decorated, this secondhand shop had a little bit of everything: from cookbooks and vintage housewares to vintage clothing/accessories to antiques and fine china. I fell in love with the housewares section as it felt like I was walking back in time to my grandparent’s cottage.

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Of course there were several other secondhand and consignment shops in Steveston, but these were the ones that I found myself drawn to as I was limited in how much time I could spend there. If you do head out that way make sure to check them all out and let me know what you think.

 

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